Commercial Datasets

The Commercial Smallsat Data Acquisition Program (CSDAP) evaluates and procures data from commercial vendors that advance NASA’s Earth science research and applications activities.

Currently, data acquired during the evaluations of Planet, Maxar (formerly DigitalGlobe, Inc.), and Spire Global are available, as are data from the Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS) through a separate collaboration with the International Space Station (ISS). See table below to learn how to access vendor specific data. All data products are available through CSDAP at no cost to authorized researchers and are subject to scientific use licenses.

The commercial data currently distributed by NASA are available under different scientific use licenses and various access portals. Please see table below for data access portals and vendor specific end user license agreement (EULA) information. Check back for updates on new data acquisitions.

End User License Agreements

Vendor Data Available Date Range Who is authorized to use the data Scientific use only 3rd party publication requires permission Where to get archived data Can PIs submit new orders EULA
Planet PlanetScope, RapidEye
12/31/2005
- Present
NASA (funded) researchers Yes No* Planet Explorer Yes Planet EULA
SkySat 03/10/2015
- 12/12/2019
SDX No**
Spire GNSS Radio Occulation 01/22/2018
- 04/18/2019
NASA (funded) researchers Yes Yes GMAO Yes Spire EULA
GNSS Reflectometry 01/09/2018
- 04/18/2019
Precise Orbital Determination (POD) 01/22/2018
- 04/18/2019
Maxar (formerly DigitalGlobe) WorldView 1, WorldView 2, WorldView 3, QuickBird,
IKONOS, and GeoEye
1/1/2000
-
Present
NASA (funded) researchers Yes Yes CAD4NASA Yes NextView License
WorldView 4 12/01/2016
- 01/07/2019
MAXAR EULA
Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. DESIS 11/21/2018
-
Present
U.S. Government (funded) researchers Yes No* TCloudHost Yes DESIS EULA

* PIs should submit publications as a courtesy copy to the vendor.

** Submissions of data requests through the SDX and distribution of the data begins on April 22, 2020.

All data requests must be approved by CSDAP data managers. Contact us to provide your name, email address, and pertinent information (grant number, contract number, etc.) to indicate that you are authorized to use the data. The CSDAP team will verify if the user is authorized for data access first. Once verified, the user will be provided with additional information on how to request and access data. Please note that submissions of data requests through the SDX and distribution of the data begins on April 22nd.

Get answers to frequently asked questions about accessing and requesting commercial data.

The tables below list available satellites, their orbits, and their sensors' temporal and spectral resolutions.

Planet

Planet
Logo of the commercial satellite company Planet
2
Photo of Planet's Planetscope satellite.

A PlanetScope satellite. Image courtesy of Planet.

PlanetScope Satellite Constellation and Sensor Characteristics
Mission Characteristics International Space Station Orbit Sun-synchronous Orbit
Orbit Altitude (reference) 400 km (51.6° inclination) 475 km (-98° inclination)
Max/Min Latitude Coverage +/- 52° (depending on season) +/- 81.5° (depending on season)
Equator Crossing Time Variable 9:30-11:30 am (local solar time)
Sensor Type Three-band frame Imager or four-band frame Imager with a split-frame NIR filter Three-band frame Imager or four-band frame Imager with a split-frame NIR filter
Spectral Bands Blue: 455-515 nm
Green: 500-590 nm
Red: 590-670 nm
NIR: 780-860 nm
Blue: 455-515 nm
Green: 500-590 nm
Red: 590-670 nm
NIR: 780-860 nm
Ground Sample Distance (nadir) 3.0 m (approximate) 3.5 m – 4 m depending on flock
Frame Size 20 km x 12 km (approximate) 24.6 km x 16.4 km (approximate)
Maximum Image Strip per Orbit 8,100 km2 20,000 km2
Revisit Time Variable Daily at nadir (early 2017)
Image Capture Capacity Variable 340 million km2/day
Camera Dynamic Range 12-bit 12-bit
Photo of Planet's RapidEye satellite.

The RapidEye satellite. Image courtesy of Planet.

RapidEye Satellite Constellation and Sensor Characteristics
Mission Characteristics Information
Number of Satellites 1
Orbit Altitude 630 km in Sun-Synchronous Orbit
Equator Crossing Time 11:00 am local time (approximately)
Sensor Type Multispectral push broom
Spectral Bands Blue: 440 – 510 nm
Green: 520 – 590 nm
Red: 630 – 685 nm
Red Edge: 690 – 730 nm
NIR: 760 – 850 nm
Ground Sampling Distance (nadir) 6.5 m
Swath Width 77 km
Maximum Image Strip per Orbit Up to 1500 km of image data per orbit
Revisit Time Daily (off-nadir) / 5.5 days (at nadir)
Image Capture Capacity > 6 million km2/day
Camera Dynamic Range 12-bit
Photo of the Planet SkySat Satellite constellation.

A SkySat satellite. Image courtesy of Planet.

SkySat Satellite Constellation and Sensor Characteristics
Attribute Value
Mass 110 kg
Dimensions 60 x 60 x 95 cm
Total DeltaV 180 m/s
Onboard Storage 360 GB + 360 GB cold spare storage
RF Communication X-band downlink (payload): variable, up to 580 Mbit/s
X-band downlink (telemetry): 64 Kbit/s
S-band uplink (command): 32 Kbit/s
Design Life ~6 years
Geolocation Knowledge 30 m CE90 in a 500 km altitude orbit
Ground Sample Distance [SkySat-1, SkySat-2]
Panchromatic: 0.86 m
Multispectral: 10 m
[SkySat-3 – SkySat-13]
Panchromatic: 0.72 m
Multispectral: 1.0 m 2.3 targets (6.6 x 10 km) per minute
Revisit (per satellite) 4-5 days
*Reference altitude 500 km
Equatorial Crossing (UTC) 10:30 – Current C-Gen satellites
13:00 – SkySat-1 and SkySat-2
13:00 – Block-2 C-Gen satellites
Image Configurations Multispectral Sensor (Blue, Green, Red, NIR)
Panchromatic Sensor
Product Framing SkySat Satellites have three cameras per satellite, which capture
overlapping strips. Each of these strips contain overlapping scenes.
One scene is approximately 2560 x 1080 pixels
Sensor Type CMOS Frame Camera with Panchromatic and Multispectral halves
Spectral Bands Blue: 450 – 515 nm
Green: 515 – 595 nm
Red: 605 – 695 nm
NIR: 740 – 900 nm
Pan: 450 – 900 nm

Spire

Spire
Logo of the small satellite company Spire.
Stratos GNSS Receiver Characteristics
Attribute Value
Total Launched 84 (as of Oct 2019)
Form Factor Cubesat
Dimensions 10x10x34.5cm
Mass < 5kg
Power Deployable Solar
Altitude 400-650 km
Lifespan 2 years
Observables GNSS-RO, GNSS-R and POD
Built By Spire

Maxar (formerly Digital Globe)

Maxar (formerly Digital Globe)
Logo for the small satellite company Maxar, formerly DigitalGlobe.
Photo of the DigitalGlobe Worldview-4 satellite.

The Worldview-4 satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe Worldview-4 Specifications
Attribute Value
Orbit Altitude: 617 km

Type: Sun Synchronous, 10:30 am descending Node

Period: 97 min.
Life Estimated service life: 10 to 12 years
Spacecraft size and aperture Size: 5.3 m (17.7 ft) tall x 2.5 m (8 ft) across

7.9 m (26 ft) across deployed solar arrays

Aperture: 1.1m
Sensor bands Panchromatic: 450 - 800 nm

4 Multispectral:

Red: 655 - 690 nm

Green: 510 - 580 nm

Blue: 450 - 510 nm

Near-IR: 780 - 920 nm
Sensor resolution
(or GSD, ground sample distance;
off-nadir is geometric mean)
Panchromatic Nadir: 0.31 m

20° Off-Nadir: 0.34 m

56° Off-Nadir: 1.00 m

Multispectral Nadir: 1.24 m

20° Off-Nadir: 1.38 m

56° Off-Nadir: 4.00 m
Dynamic range 11-bits per pixel
Swath width At nadir: 13.2 km
Attitude determination and control Type: 3-axis Stabilized

Actuators: Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)

Sensors: Star trackers, precision IRU, GPS
Pointing accuracy and knowledge Accuracy: 170 m at 40 off-nadir

Knowledge: Supports geolocation accuracy below
Retargeting agility Time to Slew 200 km: 10.6 sec
Onboard storage 3200 Gb solid state with EDAC
Communications Image & ancillary data: 800 Mbps X-band

Housekeeping: 120 kbps real time, X-band

Command: 64 kbps S-band
Max contiguous area collected in a
single pass (30° off-nadir angle)
Mono: 66.5 km x 112 km (5 strips)

Stereo: 26.6 km x 112 km (2 pairs)
Revisit frequency
(at 40°N latitude)
1 m GSD: < 1.0 day

Total constellation > 4.5 accesses/day
Geolocation accuracy
(CE90)
Predicted < 5 m CE90 without ground control
Capacity 680,000 sq km per day
Photo of the DigitalGlobe Worldview-3 satellite.

The Worldview-3 satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe Worldview-3 Specifications
Attribute Value
Orbit Altitude: 617 km

Type: Sun synchronous, 10:30 am descending node

Period: 97 min.
Life Spec Mission Life: 7.25 years

Estimated service life: 10 to 12 years
Spacecraft size, mass and power Size: 5.7 m (18.7 ft) tall x 2.5 m (8 ft) across 7.1 m (23 ft) across deployed solar arrays

Mass: 2800 kg (6200 lbs)

Power: 3.1 kW solar array, 100 Ahr battery
Sensor Bands Panchromatic: 450–800 nm
8 Multispectral:
Coastal: 397–454 nm
Blue: 445–517 nm
Blue: 445–517 nm
Green: 507–586 nm
Yellow: 580–629 nm
Red: 626–696 nm
Red Edge: 698–749 nm
Near-IR1: 765–899 nm
Near-IR2: 857–1039 nm
8 SWIR Bands:
SWIR-1: 1184–1235 nm
SWIR-2: 1546–1598 nm
SWIR-3: 1636–1686 nm

SWIR-4: 1702–1759 nm

SWIR-5: 2137–2191 nm

SWIR-6: 2174–2232 nm
SWIR-7: 2228–2292 nm

SWIR-8: 2285–2373 nm
12 CAVIS Bands:

Desert Clouds: 405–420 nm
Water-3: 930–965 nm

Aerosol-1: 459–509 nm
Green: 525–585 nm
Aerosol-2: 635–685 nm
Water-1: 845–885 nm
Water-2: 897–927 nm

NDVI-SWIR: 1220–1252 nm
Cirrus: 1365–1405 nm
Snow: 1620–1680 nm
Aerosol-1: 2105–2245 nm
Aerosol-2: 2105–2245 nm
Sensor resolution (or GSD, Ground Sample Distance; off-nadir is geometric mean) Panchromatic nadir: 0.31 m
20° off-nadir: 0.34 m
Multispectral nadir: 1.24 m
20° off-nadir: 1.38 m
SWIR nadir: 3.70 m
20° off-nadir: 4.10 m
CAVIS nadir: 30.00 m
Dynamic range 11-bits per pixel Pan and MS; 14-bits per pixel SWIR
Swath width At nadir: 13.1 km
Attitude determination and control Type: 3-axis Stabilized

Actuators: Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)

Sensors: Star trackers, precision IRU, GPS
Pointing accuracy and knowledge Accuracy: <500 m at image start/stop

Knowledge: Supports geolocation accuracy below
Retargeting agility Time to Slew 200 km: 12 sec
Onboard storage 2199 Gb solid state with EDAC
Communications Image & Ancillary Data: 800 and 1200 Mbps X-band

Housekeeping: 4, 16, 32, or 64 kbps real time, 524 kbps stored, X-band

Command: 2 or 64 kbps S-band
Max contiguous area collected in a single pass (30° off-nadir angle) Mono: 66.5 km x 112 km (5 strips)

Stereo: 26.6 km x 112 km (2 pairs)
Revisit frequency 1 m GSD: <1.0 day
(at 40°N Latitude) 4.5 days at 20° off-nadir or less
Geolocation accuracy (CE90) Predicted <3.5 m CE90 without ground control
Capacity 680,000 sq km per day
Photo of the DigitalGlobe Worldview-3 satellite.
The Worldview-2 satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.
DigitalGlobe Worldview-2 Specifications
Attribute Value
Orbit Altitude: 770 km

Type: Sun synchronous, 10:30 am descending node

Period: 100 min.
Mission Life 10-12 years, including all consumables and degradables (e.g. propellant)
Spacecraft Size, Mass and Power 5.7 m (18.7 ft) tall x 2.5 m (8 ft) across

7.1 m (23 ft) across the deployed solar arrays

2615 kg (5765 lbs)

3.2 kW solar array, 100 Ahr battery
Sensor Bands Panchromatic: 450 - 800 nm

8 Multispectral:

Coastal: 400 - 450 nm Red: 630 -690 nm

Blue: 450 - 510 nm Red Edge: 705 - 745 nm

Green: 510 - 580 nm Near-IR1: 770 - 895 nm

Yellow: 585 - 625 nm Near-IR2: 860 - 1040 nm
Sensor Resolution Panchromatic: 0.46 m GSD at nadir, 0.52 m GSD at 20° off-nadir

Multispectral: 1.85 m GSD at nadir, 2.07 m GSD at 20° off-nadir
Dynamic Range 11-bits per pixel
Swath Width 16.4 km at nadir
Attitude Determination and Control 3-axis stabilized

Actuators: Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)

Sensors: Star trackers, solid state IRU, GPS
Pointing Accuracy and Knowledge Accuracy: < 500 m at image start and stop

Knowledge: Supports geolocation accuracy below
Retargeting Agility Time to Slew 200 km: 10 sec
Onboard Storage 2199 Gb solid state with EDAC
Communications Image and Ancillary Data: 800 Mbps X-band

Housekeeping: 4, 16 or 32 kbps real-time, 524 kbps stored, X-band

Command: 2 or 64 kbps S-band
Max Contiguous Area Collected in a Single Pass
(30° off-nadir angle)
Mono: 138 x 112 km (8 strips)

Stereo: 63 x 112 km (4 pairs)
Revisit Frequency (at 40°N Latitude) 1.1 days at 1 m GSD or less

3.7 days at 20° off-nadir or less (0.52 m GSD)
Geolocation Accuracy (CE90) Demonstrated < 3.5 m CE90 without ground control
Capacity 1 million km2 per day
Photo of the DigitalGlobe Worldview-1 satellite.

The Worldview-1 satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe Worldview-1 Specifications
Attribute Value
Orbit Altitude: 496 km

Type: Sun synchronous, 10:30 am descending node

Period: 95 min.
Altitude: 496 km

Type: Sun Synchronous. 1:30 pm descending node

Period: 95 min.
Mission Life 10-12 years, including all consumables and degradables (e.g. propellant)
Spacecraft Size, Mass and Power 3.6 m (12 ft) tall x 2.5 m (8 ft) across

7.1 m (23 ft) across the deployed solar arrays

2290 kg (5038 lbs)

3.2 kW solar array, 100 Ahr battery
Sensor Bands Panchromatic: 400 - 900 nm
Sensor Resolution 50 cm Ground Sample Distance (GSD) at nadir

55 cm GSD at 20° off-nadir
Dynamic Range 11-bits per pixel
Swath Width 17.7 km at nadir
Attitude Determination and Control 3-axis stabilized

Actuators: Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)

Sensors: Star trackers, solid state IRU, GPS
Pointing Accuracy and Knowledge Accuracy: <500 m at image start and stop

Knowledge: Supports geolocation accuracy below
Retargeting Agility Time to Slew 200 km: 10 sec
Onboard Storage 2199 Gb solid state with EDAC
Communications Image and Ancillary Data: 800 Mbps X-band

Housekeeping: 4, 16 or 32 kbps real-time, 524 kbps stored, X-band

Command: 2 or 64 kbps S-band
Max Contiguous Area Collected in a Single Pass Mono: 111 x 112 km (6 strips)
(30° off-nadir angle) Stereo: 51 x 112 km (3 pairs)
Revisit Frequency 1.7 days at 1 m GSD or less
(at 40°N Latitude) 5.4 days at 20° off-nadir or less (0.55 m GSD)
Geolocation Accuracy (CE90) Demonstrated <4.0 m CE90 without ground control
Capacity 1.3 million km2 per day
Photo of DigitalGlobe, the small satellite company's Ikonos satellite.

The Ikonos satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe Ikonos Specifications
Attribute Value
Launch information Date: September 24, 1999

Launch vehicle: Athena 2

Launch site: Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
Mission life 12+ years
Spacecraft size 1.83 m × 1.57 m (hexagonal configuration)
Spatial resolution Panchromatic: 0.82 m

Multispectral: 3.2 m
Positional accuracy 15 meter CE90 (specification)

9 meter CE90 (measured)
Swath width 11.3 km
Off-nadir imaging Up to 60 degrees
Dynamic range 11 bits per pixel
Revisit time Approximately 3 days
Orbital altitude 681 km
Nodal crossing 10:30am
Collection capacity 240,000 km2/day (Pan + MSI)
Photo of the small satellite company DigitalGlobe's GeoEye-1 satellite.

The GeoEye-1 satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe GeoEye-1 Specifications
Attribute Value
Mission Life Expected >10 years
Spacecraft Size 4186 lbs, 4.34 m in length
Altitude 681 km
Orbit Type: Sun-synchronous,

10:30 am descending node

Period: 98 min
Sensor Resolution and Spectral Bandwidth Panchromatic:
41 cm GSD at nadir

Black & White: 450 - 800 nm

Multispectral:

1.65 m GSD at nadir

Blue: 450 - 510 nm

Green: 510 - 580 nm

Red: 655 - 690 nm

Near-IR: 780 - 920 nm
Dynamic Range 11-bits per pixel
Swath Width Nominal Swath Width:

15.3 km at nadir
Attitude Determination and Control Type: 3-axis Stabilized

Star tracker/IRU/reaction wheels, GPS
Retargeting Agility Time to slew 200 km: 20 sec
Onboard Storage 1 Tbit capacity
Communications Payload Data: X-band 740/150 Mbps AES/DES encryption

Housekeeping: X-band 64 kbps AES encryption
Revisit Frequency
(at 40°N Latitude)
2.6 days at 30° off-nadir
Metric Accuracy 5 m CE90, 3 m CE90 (measured)
Capacity 350,000 km2/day Multi-spectral

IMAGE

Photo of DigitalGlobe's QuickBird satellite.

The QuickBird satellite. Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe.

DigitalGlobe QuickBird Specifications
Attribute Value
Launch Information Date: October 18, 2011

Launch Vehicle: Delta II

Launch Site: SLC-2W, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
Mission Life Extended through early 2014
Spacecraft size 2400 lbs, 3.04 m (10 ft) in length
Model Altitude 400 km Altitude 450 km
Orbit Type: Sun Synchronous, 10:00 am descending node
Period: 92.4 min.
10:25 am descending node
Period: 93.6 min
Sensor Resolution and spectral bandwidth Panchromatic:
55 cm GSD at nadir
Black & White: 405 - 1053 nm
Multispectral:

2.16 m GSD at nadir

Blue: 430 – 545 nm

Green: 466 – 620 nm

Red: 590 – 710 nm

Near-IR: 715 – 918 nm
Panchromatic
61 cm GSD at nadir
Multispectral:

2.44 m GSD at nadir
Dynamic range 11 bits per pixel 11 bits per pixel
Swath width Nominal Swath Width:
14.9 km at nadir
Nominal swath width:
16.8 km at nadir
Attitude determination and control Type: 3-axis Stabilized
Star tracker/IRU/reaction wheels, GPS
Type: 3-axis Stabilized
Star tracker/IRU/reaction wheels, GPS
Retargeting agility Time to slew 200 km: 37 sec 38 sec
Onboard Storage 128 Gb capacity 128 Gb capacity
Communications Payload Data: 320 Mbps X-band
Housekeeping: X-band from 4, 16 and 256 Kbps, 2 Kbps S-band uplink
Payload Data: 320 Mbps X-band
Housekeeping: X-band from 4, 16 and 256 Kbps, 2 Kbps S-band uplink
Revisit Frequency (at 40oN Latitude) Revisit time may vary from 2 to 12 days depending on target location as the orbit decays. Revisit time may vary from 2 to 12 days depending on target location as the orbit decays.
Metric accuracy 23 m CE90, 17 m LE90 (without ground control) 23 m CE90, 17 m LE90 (without ground control)
Capacity 200,000 sq km per day 200,000 sq km per day

Teledyne Brown Engineering

Teledyne Brown Engineering
Photo of the Desis small cube satellite.

The DESIS satellite.

DESIS Performance Specifications
Parameter DESIS values (Commissioning Phase)
Orbit (type, local time at equator, inclination, altitude, period, repeat cycle) not Sun-synchronous, various, 51.6°, 405 ± 5 km, 93 min, no repeat cycle
Coverage 55° N to 52° S
Tilt (across-track, along-track) -45° to +5°, -40° to +40° by MUSES and DESIS
Sensor pointing ±15° along-track to enable BRDF or Stereo acquisitions
Spectral coverage 402 nm to 1000 nm
Number of spectral channels 235 (no binning) ~2.5nm

118 (binning 2)

79 (binning 3)
60 (binning 4) ~10nm, this product will be available June 2019
Defective spectral channels (see footnote 2 below for description and location) Bands 1 – 7 (no binning)
Bands 1 – 4 (binning 2)
Bands 1 – 3 (binning 3)
Bands 1 – 2 (binning 4)
Spectral sampling resolution 2.55 nm (w/o binning); ~10.2 nm (binning 4)
Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) ~3.5 nm (w/o binning); ~10.0 nm (binning 4)
Radiometric resolution 12 bits + 1 bit gain
Radiometric accuracy +/-10% (based on on-ground calibration and with the support of inflight radiometric calibration)
Radiometric linearity 99%
Swath 30 km
Spatial resolution, pixels 30 m, 1024 pixels (@400 km)
Geometric accuracy ~20 m with GCPs1
~300 m - 400 m w/o GCPs
MTF @ Nyquist 30%-40% based on on-ground calibration / static MTF without smearing effects / wavelength depending
Signal-to-Noise ratio (albedo 0.3 @ 550 nm) 195 (w/o binning)
386 (4 binning)
(based on on-ground calibration)
Dark/Read noise (electrons) 30-60e- (global shutter)
15-30e- (rolling shutter)
Quantum scale equivalent (e-/DN) 0.04 e-/DN
Max frame rate 235Hz (@235 spectral lines, rolling shutter)
117Hz (@235 spectral lines, global shutter)
Solar zenith angle restrictions
(for L2A level processing)
> 55° produces reduced quality L2A product
> 65° produces low quality L2A product
> 70° not processable to L2A

1 with respect to global reference Landsat ETM+ PAN with GSD 14 m.

Page Last Updated: May 21, 2020 at 9:30 AM EDT